What’s All the Fuss About Foam?

Written By

2 Mar 2012

Ever really think about what’s inside your office chair, couch or motorcycle seat?

In most cases it’s foam, and that’s the subject of this 4th chapter in our continuing series “Motorcycle Seats 101.”

For a seat to be comfortable, “it’s what’s inside that counts”. The most important component of comfort no matter what type of seat you are sitting on is the seat foam–both the quality of the foam itself and its shape.

Not all foam padding is created equal. There are essentially two ways to make a “seat shape” out of foam. You can take a large cube of foam and then whittle and grind it down to the shape you want (a relatively cheap and easy process) or you can create the foam in the density and the exact shape you need…all from scratch.

Mustang has perfected a “controlled density” polyurethane formula with the perfect mixture of open and closed foam cells to provide all day comfort for riders. For example, an open cell foam can be easily squeezed or flattened (like a kitchen sponge) while closed cell foam is extremely firm and can barely be compressed (such as a firm life preserver).

Before the foam is mixed, however, a heavy-duty fiberglass mold must be created to perfectly match the seat shape that was designed in Mustang’s R&D department. Once the mold is perfected, the liquid foam solution is poured into the mold.

The lid of the mold must be quickly and securely closed to withstand the force as, within minutes, the chemicals react and the liquid is solidified within the mold–a process similar to a giant waffle maker.

As soon as the foam has cured, the lid is opened and the foam mold is extracted and ready to be hand-built into a Mustang seat—but that’s a later chapter.

Mustang’s high quality foam usually feels firmer than stock but is less firm than other aftermarket seats. It will compress enough to mold itself to your body shape within about 15 minutes of riding time–every time you ride. You do not need a “break-in” period to be comfortable. Your 100th ride will be equal to your 10,000th mile.

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